Category Archives: Like these links

Thank you Kerri

I started blogging a little over seven years ago. By that time, Kerri Morrone Sparling had been writing at Six Until Me for nearly seven of her fourteen years.

Saturday, she published her last blog post at that location. While I’m sad that I won’t be able to go there to find something new, I’m also happy for what comes next for Kerri.

People will occasionally ask me about people in the diabetes community, and what they’re like. When I’m asked about Kerri, all I can say is what you read is what you get. Believe it or not, that makes her unique.

I’ve never reached greatness in anything I’ve been involved in, but I’ve been lucky enough to interact with a number of people over the years who were at the top of their field. Nearly to a person, they all differed from who they seemed to be at a distance. In a couple of cases, they were downright jerks.

But Kerri is different. No secret anger hiding just below the surface, no friendly public persona wrapped around a desire to escape from all human interaction. No asking for everyone else to help with everything else while singularly taking credit for a group achievement.

Every time I’ve encountered Kerri, I’ve walked away from our conversation feeling better. That doesn’t happen often, and it happens even less often when encountering someone who has absolutely no incentive to be nice to me.

Kerri, I’ve also learned from you. I have my own style of writing, but I’ve learned how to write about a difficult subject by watching how you did it. I’ve learned how to take being gracious to a new level. I’ve learned how great it feels to do something nice for someone without anyone ever knowing about it.

I’ve been happy to share the internet with you for seven years Kerri, and happier still that you’ve always been more popular than me. Because you deserve it, and because you’re probably better at dealing with the slings and arrows that are sometimes thrown at someone sitting on such a lofty perch.

I’m going to miss reading the remarkable displays of your rapier wit, and the world will be lesser for it. But… I will be thoroughly satisfied with the Kerri that emerges from this transition.

I realize this is all kind of sappy, and kind of suck up, but I promise not to write about this tomorrow. For now though, I think a little gratitude and celebration are in order.

Thank you Kerri… I know that what comes next will be worth waiting for.

Thanks diaTribe.

Every so often over the next, oh, three or four months, I’d like to take a few blog posts and pay tribute to a few of the institutions that help make my walk with diabetes more informative and meaningful.

Today, I write in praise of diaTribe.

Imagine trying to start, from scratch, an organization (the diaTribe Foundation) dedicated to providing valuable information on everything from accuracy and reliability of diabetes devices, to results of important clinical trials. Then, add in sharing this information online, in a format the average reader (like me and other patients) can understand.

A website where people can get factual information on everything diabetes… and when I say everything diabetes, I mean all of it. The good, the bad, and the ugly, in terms that connect with each individual reader.

Now, imagine also sharing this information in public forums, where many can hear firsthand about new drugs, the importance of time in range, and emerging therapies. Kelly Close, Adam Brown, and others are out there taking part in focus groups and speaking at FDA workshops, helping to advance the art and understanding of managing diabetes for everyone.

I especially like reading the New Now Next and Conference Pearls columns, because they’re great for catching up on things I’m particularly interested in. And the Adam’s Corner columns are great because his perspective is always unique, and one I want to consider when thinking about my own diabetes.

I don’t know how much of all this Kelly Close had in mind when diaTribe began, but she and her amazing organization has been at the forefront of reporting on diabetes research, new products, changes in standards of care, and more in the way few self-sustaining organizations can ever hope to be.

I am happy to say I receive regular updates from diaTribe in my e-mail inbox every week. I can’t say I always immediately go to diaTribe to read the latest, but I almost always go there at some point during the week to learn what I don’t know already, or learn a different perspective on something I thought I already knew. There are very few places on the internet where I can say that’s the case.

Consistency. Reliability. Integrity.

diaTribe.org

Certainly one of my most valuable reference sources. What’s one of yours?

Like these links.

Happy Friday, everyone. I hope you’re wearing blue today to recognize and support everyone living with and affected by diabetes. So in that vein, let me say Happy #BlueFridays!

Now, on to today’s links for your perusal:
 
 
Every so often, I go to this site to read what people write. I may have also written something there once. Sometimes, it’s a real help to have a place to unload, and to read and know you’re not alone. Thanks to Christopher Snider for creating
MyDiabetesSecret.com
 
 
Do you ever find yourself straining to understand or explain terms like average glucose, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation? Want to know more about what you’re looking at in those CGM or meter downloads? Then you’re going to want to keep this article from Adam Brown and Divya Gopisetty at diaTribe handy. Spoiler alert: it includes examples too!
Understanding Average Glucose, Standard Deviation, CV, and Blood Sugar Variability
 
 
I don’t quite know how to explain this story, but it involves sunscreen, moisturizers, pump and CGM placement, and it’s not porn. But, as Kelly Kunik will tell you, the struggle is real.
Diabetes Hardware & The Moisturizer/Sunscreen Chess Game
 
 
I’m always jealous of Renza Scibilia, because she gets to travel to amazing conferences where things like #DOCDay happen, like at the annual EASD conference in Berlin recently. Her mention of the new Diatravellers initiative caught my eye too.
#DOCDAY at EASD2018
 
 
Read anything fun, inspiring, or interesting lately? Please share! In the meantime, enjoy your weekend, and I’ll catch up with you next week.

Like these links: T2 love, diversity, and The Social Diabetes Project.

It’s been a while since I’ve shared what I found in the Diabetes Online Community, so I thought I would make this Thursday edition of Happy Medium about some of the other great writers and advocates out there. Ready? Here we go:
 
 
First of all, I don’t give enough T2 love via my blogroll.

I need to rectify that.

So I’ve added some links to fabulous Type 2 advocates and writers this week. Here are two:
Corinna Cornejo at Type 2 Musings
Bea Sparks at The Type 2 Experience

Here are two more Type 2s, who happened to sit down and talk recently about their experience with the Freestyle Libre CGM. Here are the links to their stories:
Phyllisa at Diagnosed Not Defeated
Sue at Diabetes Ramblings

You’ll find Phyllisa and Sue’s blogs in my blogroll in the future, and I’m feeling pretty good about that.
 
 
The other thing that’s been missing from my blogroll has been diversity. So I’m going to try and do something about that too, by adding Phyllisa and these super advocates:
Ariel at Just a Little Suga’
Mila at Hangry Woman

Ariel has a great take on life, and I love reading the stories she shares. Mila’s recipes are definitely bolus worthy and drool worthy.
 
 
Finally, I can’t leave you today without sharing the link to The Social Diabetes Project: 2018. Written by Kerri Marrone Sparling, it’s an in depth look at the history of the Diabetes Online Community, the rise (and leveling off) of diabetes blogging, all of the various platforms where patients and advocates have interacted in the past and interact today, and terrific viewpoints from people who have been there for all of it. When you have a break in your schedule, or even if you don’t, this is well worth your time.
The Social Diabetes Project: 2018
 
 
That’s all for now, though that should keep you busy for a bit. I hope you’re enjoying your week. Remember… we’re always better when everyone is included.

Like these links.

Welcome to a Friday rundown of some things I’ve read recently from our glorious Diabetes Online Community. I encourage you to check these out, and how about leaving a comment or two for the writers? Sound good? Here we go:
 
 
A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post about how our diabetes can be different from person to person, and how we have many ways of managing our condition. In the end though, we take what we learn and personalize it to come up with the best life with diabetes we can. The post was titled You do You.

Well, guess what? Renza wrote about the same thing, and also covered the fact that just because I don’t manage my diabetes like you do, I’m not wrong. Neither are you. I had to add a reference to it here, because it’s better than mine and because I like strong language when the situation calls for it. Renza’s post is titled:
You do You
 
 
Are you a dude? Are you interested in knowing more about dudes with diabetes? It is Men’s Health Month, after all, and Wil Dubois at Diabetes Mine has a great rundown on how diabetes affects everything about being a man:
Talking Sense to Men with Diabetes (During Men’s Health Month and Beyond)
 
 
I’m not a parent, so I’m not a parent of a child living with diabetes. But if you are, or if you were ever parented as a child with diabetes, you’ll want to read this from Meri, because it’s true and it will make you feel good:
A step by step guide to perfection
 
 
Finally, Laddie at Test, Guess and Go wrote something that pretty much sums up my life with a CGM these days. I’m glad I’m not the only one:
Living on Planet Dexcom
 
 
Enjoy your weekends kids… I’m off to D.C. for a diabetes meetup Saturday, then to a play on Sunday. Talk to you next week!

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