Monthly Archives: December 2017

Be kind. Be supportive.

Do you ever feel like you’ll never be able to catch up? Like, you’re in that dream where you can’t possibly run faster, but you can’t run fast enough?

I think we all experience that sort of thing from time to time. Some people live for that kind of existence… if they’re not struggling to keep up, they think there must be something wrong. Others get overstressed the minute they schedule one meeting to start exactly when the previous meeting is set to end.

Gee… we all react differently to stress. Not exactly a scoop of a story, from my point of view. How we react to stress tells us exactly nothing.

Honestly, we do all react differently to stress, including the fact that some of us don’t even recognize it as stress at all. I think just like diabetes, we all react to stress differently, and we all manage it differently.

And that’s okay. If we had one exact strategy for dealing with the stressors in our lives, you know we’d all be working on it. But most people handle stress with a mixture of dread and resolve, and sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t. There’s no use complaining about the things that get us worked up.

But… and this is a big But… sometimes the stress is too much. Sometimes we can’t just work our way through it. If that’s the case, we need help and we should be okay with seeking it.

Likewise, when someone else is having a tough time of it, instead of just complaining more, instead of judging someone experiencing difficulty dealing with their stress, we should be actively supporting that someone. Helping them feel not alone, maybe reminding them that you’ve been there too, and giving them the space they need to feel like they’re not being manipulated by life like they’re a little marionette.

In the end, it’s not a perfect appointment book or a perfectly clean home or anything else that makes us feel good as much as people do. Let’s remember to be kind this holiday season, but also be supportive. You and your friends and loved ones are well worth the effort.

Advertisements

8 Things: Holiday gifts for everyone living with diabetes.

Hey, how are you? I hope you’re in the middle of a rather stupendous holiday season.

I hope that gifts are in order this year. Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hannukah, or another holiday, giving and getting are AWESOME. So let’s look at 8 holiday gifts all People With Diabetes could really use this year:

1. More support. There are new diabetes diagnoses every day. There are new people waking up, like I did six years ago, realizing their diabetes doesn’t exist in a vacuum.

I hope those people find the hope and support that I found when I found this community. And I hope they pay it forward when they do.

2. Laughter. I can’t tell you how long it’s been since I really laughed hard. I’m ready for something really funny to just knock me out of my chair.

Likewise, I think it would be really great if I could make someone else laugh too. I just hope it’s not because I did something really embarrassing at the same time.

3. Retail Competition for Closed Loop Systems. Honestly, the #WeAreNotWaiting movement, and all of the do-it-yourself systems it has spawned, has taken a bit of the wind out of the sails out of the commercial artificial pancreas designers out there.

Eventually, we know these systems (the iLet, Cell Novo, etc.) will be approved, but whenever we start to see rollout of non-DIY closed loop, I hope it’s not just one at a time. Good, reliable technology is what we need, and we need more than one option to choose from.

4. More knowledge sharing. Here at Happy Medium, I try to do my best to keep you as up-to-date as I can on the latest diabetes happenings, especially when it comes to news out of Washington, D.C., and items I gather from attendance at various conferences, research summits, and symposia.

I would like to see more of that from everyone in our community, or at least a sharing of resources for learning about new developments in diabetes. Not just, “Here’s the group I spoke in front of today”– which is still good, and should be shared– but also an occasional post that says, “I read this interesting thing today”, or “This event is happening in your area”. I don’t see much of that anymore.

5. A couple of diabetes memes. I can’t handle something new every week, but it’s fun when we can get out of whatever rut we’re in and post something on a common theme. Hey, I’m not the only one with good ideas!

I love Diabetes Blog Week, and I loved the social media #MakeDiabetesVisible campaign during Diabetes Awareness Month. Again, I don’t need a prompter all the time, but it might be cool to do a #dblog Check-in Day, or Diabetes Art Day, or No-D Day again.

6. A couple of recipes might be nice too. One of my favorite things to do here is share recipes, but I haven’t done a lot of that lately. Have I shared every recipe I know?

Chances are, I haven’t. Chances are, you haven’t either. Maybe it’s time to search our cookbooks (give credit where credit is due) and family recipes and deliver something new for everyone’s palate to enjoy.

7. Less Uncertainty. Let’s face it… we’ve been through the wringer on this Affordable Care Act thing. Ever since this time last year, we’ve all been worried out of our minds about whether ACA will still exist, and whether it will be as helpful and as accessible as it has been up to now.

We’ve always known it was broken. Damn few of us expected a so-called “fix” that would break it entirely. Let’s stop the uncertainty, congress. Let’s take away the roadblocks toward giving Americans the same healthcare rights available in every other decent nation in the world. Do that, congress, and maybe I’ll use the big C when I refer to you again.

8. More Kindness. Any change, meaningful change, change that lasts, begins and ends with kindness. Empathy. Decency. Change that lasts does not include cheating, lying, or calling people, even elected officials, names.

This gift could also go to some of our friends in the diabetes community, who have been less than friendly with people not living with their type of diabetes, or are fans of one cause but not another. We all want the same thing. Bashing each other to get there, or to get more notice, is a recipe for eventual failure. You might get your way initially. But no one is going to be excited about how you got there, and that will be shown in their overwhelming lack of support for you.
 
 
However you celebrate the holidays, I hope they are full of gifts, however you define them. And happiness, however you define it. Here’s to us this holiday season… may we celebrate many, many more!

Forty (or more) Winks.

I’ve been feeling tired lately. Like really, really tired.

That’s not uncommon among people living with diabetes… if you consider all the time diabetes tasks require of us, it’s a wonder we get any sleep at all. Add in getting up to use the facilities thanks to a nighttime high, or getting up to ingest carbs thanks to a nighttime low, and you’re talking about even less shuteye.

Is my age a factor? Is it causing me to get less sleep, or not process the sleep I get as well as when I was younger? I suspect one or both of these might be factors.

Real people sick is a thing too. Managing a cold or the flu while already managing an existing chronic condition will wear out anyone.

And let’s not forget other outside influences: the political climate, an economy that we hope will be good but we’ve seen crash before, and work-related stress all play their part too.

In my case, I guess I would have to add in advocacy, and a renewed effort to connect to friends and family more. These are good things, but I can’t sleep when I’m at meetings or other gatherings. What I mean is, when we’re involved in more and more activities, we have less time to just sit, relax, and let our brains and bodies recharge.

For additional context, I’ll refer you to this post at Diabetes Forecast. I especially like the quote “Your brain is a glucose guzzler”.

So what’s a fella to do?

Some of these are no-brainer ideas. Some are just things that work for me. All of them, if implemented properly, should help me get the most out of my downtime:

1. Go to bed! When you’re “on stage”, as the Disney Parks management puts it, all day, it’s hard to come home and suddenly shut your brain off so you can sleep. But I’m also guilty of staying up late, really late, on those rare days when I don’t have something scheduled the next day. I usually get up around the same time every morning, so that means I’m not even getting the most sleep I can get when I can get it. That has to stop. Everything in moderation.

2. Get into better shape. I’ve always been active, but less so in the past couple of years as I’ve gotten busier. Not only do I miss working out more, I need it so I can be stronger on those days when I really need it. It seems counterintuitive to try to add more into my schedule, but in this case, I think there will be a significant return on the investment of my time in being stronger.

3. Find the hidden wastes in my daily routine. Like Frank Bunker Gilbreth Sr. and his wife Lillian, I want to find the “one best way” to go through my days, so I can cut down on the time needed to finish items on my to-do list. I probably won’t find too much wasted motion, but if I look, I’ll likely find something. Even if I don’t find a lot of leeway, when your life is full of schedules to keep, every minute of leeway you gain is significant.

4. Stop complaining about it! Look, this is what I signed up for… this is what I wanted. I want to remain as healthy as possible, but maybe an attitude change could stop me from griping about how I feel every time I wake up in the morning.
 
 
There is probably more I can consider. But I think I’ll start with those four and see where it leads. It’s not about turning myself into a robot who only thinks of sleep, work, and wake. It’s about carving time out of my day to have the freedom to relax, or to have fun, or just to think.

We’re not meant to be robots. We’re meant to be living, breathing, flexible, adaptable human beings. But this human being needs to get more sleep.

%d bloggers like this: