Advocating with DPAC Champions

It’s been another incredibly busy week, in the middle of an incredibly busy year. I’m through talking about it, but I just thought I would mention that as the reason why I’ve been silent here this week.

But last weekend… last weekend was full and eventful. I was fortunate enough to have been able to go to Washington, D.C. for the very first DPAC Policy Training Meeting.

Disclosure: DPAC paid for my hotel and parking for this event. All opinions are owned entirely by me.

Diabetes Patient Advocacy Coalition (DPAC) held this training meeting to help about 30 of us advocates learn about important issues that many of us have been discussing, and to learn how to more effectively advocate our positions before lawmakers. Saturday and Sunday were about learning, and Monday was about going to Capitol Hill and putting what we learned into action before Congressional staffers.

Saturday and Sunday were spent learning the ins and outs of why the price of insulin is getting higher and higher. We also learned about two measures before the United States Congress right now: House Resolution 5768 and Senate Bill 3366 – Expanding Access to Diabetes Self-Management Training Act of 2018.

Let’s take a look at each of these, one at a time.

Access to affordable insulin

It’s no secret that the price of insulin is skyrocketing. In fact, the cost of insulin has tripled in the past 15 years. That is not sustainable.

However, the Congressional Diabetes Caucus has requested information from a number of end points in the insulin supply chain (fancy talk for patients, medical professionals, pharma, pharmacy benefit managers). They’ve received information back, and they’ve been compiling their findings in a report, which is due to be released soon… hopefully, within the next month.

At the moment, there is no legislation before Congress which will address the price of insulin. But if we’re going to get there, we need to know where the pain points are. We’re hoping this report will shed some light on that, and that’s why we asked lawmakers to share that report the moment they get it, with their constituents and with DPAC, because there’s nothing better than transparency when it comes to something like this.

Diabetes Self-Management Training Act

Sponsored in the House by Representative Tom Reid (R-NY) and co-sponsored in the Senate by Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Susan Collins (R-ME), These companion bills aim to increase access to diabetes self-management training for senior citizens who are on Medicare. This is incredibly important for a number of reasons.

Imagine living on Medicare for 10 years after retirement. We know how much diabetes technology and treatment can change in just a decade. Sometimes it’s like drinking from a fire hose. But imagine not having diabetes self-management training (or DSMT) paid for by Medicare when you need it then. Today, Medicare pays for 10 hours of training in the first year, and just 2 hours after that. This bill would change that.

Did you know that Medicare recipients can’t receive Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) and DSMT on the same day? So, if you’re 75, and it’s already an effort to get to the hospital where the training is conducted, but you have to go one day for MNT and another day for DSMT. Doesn’t make sense, does it? This bill would change that.

The bill would also allow for DSMT to be delivered outside of a medical professional setting… think local library or fire department meeting hall. There’s also a provision to look into expanding virtual training via telehealth or online. Both of these could be game-changers for people in rural communities like Dorchester County, Maryland, which has the highest prevalence of diabetes of any county in my state, but where many people live 30 or more miles away from a hospital.

We know that since we’re nearing the end of the 115th Congress, there’s virtually no chance of these measures passing before the end of the year. But we went and asked lawmakers to sign on as co-sponsors of the legislation so that when this comes up (as it undoubtedly will) in the 116th Congress, it will be much easier for these Congressmen and Senators to say yes.

For more on this important legislation, click HERE.

The best part of the long weekend? Going to the U.S. Capitol with my fellow DPAC Champions to advocate before Congressional staffers. My meetings with staff from the offices of Rep. John Sarbanes (D-MD), Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), and Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) were productive and helpful. We didn’t get a single No on anything. A huge success.

Before I wrap up, a few Thank Yous:

Thanks to Christel Marchand Aprigliano and Leyla Mansour-Cole from DPAC for organizing the weekend and doing the cat herding so the DPAC Champions would be in the best position possible to fulfill our mission.

Thanks to Logan Hoover, Legislative Assistant for Representative Tom Reid (R-NY), who is Chair of the Congressional Diabetes Caucus. He spent time with us on Sunday to give us valuable information on how to share our stories and make an impact with the people we met on Monday.

Thank you to Jasmine Gonzalvo for being an amazing supporter and educator over the weekend, on the importance of both of these initiatives. And to Stewart Perry and George Huntley for doing an amazing job of explaining how “market forces” (my quotation marks), rather than patient empathy, have impacted the price of insulin in the USA.

Finally, thanks to our friends at the Endocrine Society and Lions Club International for partnering with us in this effort. It takes a village, and I’m glad to have these people on my block.
 
 
It’s easy to think of this event as a culmination of lots of effort on the part of DPAC, its Board of Directors, its Patient Advisory Board, and DPAC Champions. I tend to think of this as a beginning.

There was a construction site across from our hotel this weekend, with a big wall surrounding it, and messages on the wall. When I saw two of the messages, I knew what this weekend meant for me.
It took all of us from a “What if?”…

…to a “Why not?”

Whatever the message, I’m confident that the progress we’re making will help to yield positive results for People With Diabetes in the United States.

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Comments

  • Rick Phillips  On October 7, 2018 at 8:33 pm

    More and better trained advocates is good for our whole community. Bravo Stephen.

    Liked by 1 person

  • n1iwr  On October 8, 2018 at 1:54 am

    A HUGE thanks to u, Steve, & to DOAC for all y’all do for us D folk!!! Thanks for taking a weekend where u could have relaxed or even gotten a few things off ur “honey do” list but instead worked to make life easier for all of us PWD!! It doesn’t go unnoticed!! HUGS!!!

    Liked by 1 person

Trackbacks

  • […] The hot topics sessions (tag-teamed by Christel Marchand Aprigliano and Leyla Mansour-Cole) included a recap of some actual wins from this year (CGM data on smartphones for Medicare recipients), and advocacy items to keep our eyes on in the coming year. It looks like 2019 will include focus on a comprehensive vision bill for PWDs, and the re-ask on H.R. 5768 and S.B. 3366, which I wrote about earlier. […]

    Like

  • By Giving Thanks | Diabetes Blog - Happy-Medium.net on November 21, 2018 at 10:12 am

    […] and allowed me to be a part of the DPAC Policy Training Meeting in September, which included my first-ever chance to advocate before lawmakers. Count also Maryland’s Secretary of Health, who, through an appointment, allowed me to serve […]

    Like

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