Tag Archives: Snap pump

And then there’s the real world.

With the excitement over Diabetes Blog Week, I was brought right back down to earth again with two important pieces of news.

One of these stories you probably know already, and one you may not know about at all:

Asante Solutions, makers of the Snap insulin pump (I did the 30 day trial of the Snap last summer), has closed up shop. They left a message on their website Friday saying that they were no longer in business.

This comes as a shock to many, including me. I was so happy with my trial of the Snap last year that I was ready to sign up with Asante the very minute they were approved to use Novolog cartridges (their product only used cartridges filled with Humalog). It was an easy pump to use, it had all of the regular features you’d expect on a pump, plus a couple of extras including its own flashlight, and those glass-filled cartridges filled with Humalog. No more filling reservoirs doesn’t seem like that big of a deal until you actually don’t have to do it anymore. Now, with such a unique feature, Snap users can only use the pump as long as the insulin they have on hand lasts. Unless someone figures out how to refill the used cartridges, which, I don’t even want to think about right now.

It was a big deal last August when Asante announced a partnership of sorts with Dexcom to integrate the Dex mobile app into the Snap architecture. Now that is all for naught, many previously happy pump users have to go searching again, and through the insurance paperwork gauntlet again, and over 100 employees are out of a job.

If you’re a Snap user, you do have an option to transition to the Animas Vibe system. According to Asante’s going out of business announcement, “Animas is graciously offering a limited time offer to all existing Snap users to transition to the Animas Vibe pump.”

No word yet on what that offer might be. To get on your local rep’s call sheet with Animas, call 877-937-7867, extension 1562.

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Let’s talk about something better: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is seeking our input again!

The FDA has prepared draft guidance on collecting and submitting patient preference information, so FDA can consider the benefit-risk thinking of patients using medical devices like insulin pumps and CGMs.

From the introduction of this document, in FDA’s own words:
 
 
”FDA believes that patients can and should bring their own experiences to bear in helping the Agency to evaluate the risk-benefit profile of certain devices.”
 
 
I’m all for that. Once the draft is finalized, it will become the new standard for how FDA thinks about patient preferences when reviewing the devices we use to help us live better lives.

One thing the draft guidance won’t do: It won’t change review standards for safety and effectiveness, and it won’t create extra burden on sponsors of premarket submissions of devices to FDA.

Still, pretty exciting that we’re being asked for our feedback, that our input will result in edits to existing benefit-risk guidance already in place, and that FDA plans to take it seriously during reviews.

We have until August 17 to leave comments on this guidance, and I, along with some others, are still going over this to try and better understand it (it’s 35 pages long). Hopefully, more information will be forthcoming (he said all officially-sounding).

To get a look at the draft guidance and leave a comment, CLICK HERE.

When was the last time anyone ever asked you to talk about what you like or don’t like about your devices? Asked you what you can live with, and what you can’t? Here’s your chance.

Expect to hear more about this soon.
 
 
 

Decision 2014: What’s the Snap really like?

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It’s been two weeks for me on the Snap insulin pump from Asante. I’m wearing the Snap as part of a free trial offered by Asante to all prospective customers. They’ll give you four weeks on the pump, supplies included, along with a voucher for the insulin cartridges you’ll need during your trial. So far, this is the only company I’ve considered that offered a free trial. Anyway, since it’s been a two weeks, I thought it might be time to give a little more insight. Hopefully, this won’t be too long… but since I’ve been able to check this one out more than any of the others, I probably have a little more to say about it. Here goes:

Set changes: When you’re working with the Snap, you’re working with pre-filled 300 unit insulin cartridges. The infusion set is self-priming too. You don’t have to worry about reservoir fill-ups or air bubbles, and that means you wind up wasting a lot less insulin just hooking yourself up again. Definitely a plus. As a result, you’ll probably spend more time on each cartridge. For that, Asante plans for you to use one specific set (with the primer(?) connector) for your changes including insulin. Then they want you to use a different set (without the connector) after 72 hours if your cartridge isn’t running out of life juice. I’m not sure how all that works, because personally, I’m not about to do a set change after three days, then another one 48 hours later. I just kept the first set in for the normal 5 days (5 ½?) it takes me to go through 300 units. And unless I’m dealing with some serious heat, that doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem. I will add, also, that the simple time savings of having a pre-filled cartridge isn’t that big a deal for me, though it is nice.

Humalog Only Accepted Here: Also, let’s not forget that the cartridges come in Humalog only. I’ve been primarily a Novolog user up to now. This is only my experience, so take it with a grain of salt: In my 2-plus weeks on the Snap, I’ve found that Humalog brings me down from spikey highs, but it does so in a very slow, stairstep kind of way compared to Novolog. As a result, I’m learning to avoid things like potato chips and pizza. I am getting better at managing my diabetes with Humalog, so this isn’t necessarily a deal breaker. Though that’s a good thing, it’s crazy to think I’ll never eat those foods again. If I had a choice between the two, I’d stick with Novolog for now.

Striker! You’re coming in too low! (Bonus points if you know which movie that’s from) One of the issues I found (that I don’t remember being covered in training, but I may have missed it) is that when your BG comes in under 70 mg/dL at the moment you’re sitting down for a meal, you can’t use the smart bolus feature. This happened a couple of times during my trial. My pre-meal check came in at 64 or 60, and I couldn’t enter those numbers using the smart bolus feature. To get around this, I wound up entering my BG number for the smart bolus at 70, then dialing down the insulin amount slightly to get to where I think I would be okay, as long as I ate right away. Also: When you do treat before eating, you do have the ability to enter in the carbs you already had (First Carbs), then the carbs you’re about to eat on a separate screen. It will figure out your bolus accordingly.

As a (somewhat) veteran insulin pumper, this feature drives me crazy. But if I was new to pumping, or a CDE or doctor working with someone new to pumping, I might find this a great safety feature. Again, this isn’t a deal breaker or a deal maker for me. It’s just a quirk of using the Snap, and I thought you should know about it.

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I should also mention that the Snap will deliver boluses three different ways: The Now Bolus, Timed Bolus, and Combo Bolus. The Now Bolus is delivered right away. The Timed Bolus delivers your bolus at a specific amount of time (minimum 30 minutes). And the Combo Bolus is pretty much like the Dual Wave bolus on the Medtronic pumps… delivering a set amount now, and a set amount later, predetermined by the user (in 15 minute increments, which I like).

Beep volume: Love, love love the beep volume on this thing. I also love that it’s adjustable. This is such a simple feature. Why can’t other pumps incorporate this idea?

Additional features: The pump has a flashlight feature on it. That’s nice if you need a light and can’t find one anywhere else. Otherwise, turn the light on. If you’re low, your significant other will forgive you. Sorry… I don’t mean to make light of this feature… it shows that the manufacturer has added something that most People With Diabetes will find helpful.

The Snap also has the ability to create more than one basal profile. Again, I think all pumps should have this feature. When I do a long bike ride, I want to be able to change my basal profile for the entire day, not just perform a temp basal then forget about it once it’s complete.

Bolus delivery is pretty fast. Not sure how big a deal that may be for you (it is not a big deal to me), but I thought I would mention it. On the scale of bolus delivery speed, I’d put the Animas Ping at the top, then the Snap, then Medtronic, and t:slim far behind.

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Finding your daily totals and how they translate into 5 day, 10, day, or 14 day averages (14 days is the highest setting) via the Log Book menu item is pretty easy. This is another feature that I don’t remember covering, but it was easy for me to find. Again, I think new pumpers (and their medical teams) may find this helpful.

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Ease of use: The Snap is actually a pretty easy pump to use. Not a lot of clicks to get around to what you need. Menu descriptions make sense. If you like the pre-filled cartridge idea, and the self-priming, that’s an added bonus. I could imagine myself using this pump on a daily basis.

Here’s where I will also tell you that the local pump rep has been fantastic, answering questions and calling me a few days after I began to see if I had any follow-up questions or issues.

In a few days, I’ll be sending the pump back to Asante. Not because I’m not satisfied. Rather, because I want a little time to do some additional research and decide what is best for me from both a patient and an economic perspective.

I hope you’ve found this recap helpful. And if there’s anything else you’d like to know, be sure to ask.
 
 
Disclosure: I’ve been on a standard four week trial of the Asante Snap insulin pump. This is the same trial that is available to all users who are considering starting on insulin pump therapy, or are considering a pump change. I was not given anything by Asante, and I was not asked to write about my experiences. In fact, I did not tell them I’m a writer at all. All opinions, as always, are my own.
 
 
 

Start of the Snap.

Before I begin today, please allow me to say Happy Anniversary to my wife of 21 years. No baseball games tonight Maureen… let’s celebrate!

Part of my day Wednesday was spent getting training and getting started on my four week trial of the Asante Snap insulin pump.

Asante is confident enough in their product to offer a free four week trial of the Snap pump to prospective customers, complete with a voucher to help pay for the Humalog cartridges required for the pump’s use (side note: Asante, you have no idea how much I appreciate the help). In the end, it’s not much different from Medtronic, who, after I would submit insurance paperwork and a prescription, would help me through the process of purchasing the 530g system, then allow me to return it within 30 days if I wasn’t satisfied. The biggest difference between the two (I had to submit the same type of paperwork for my Snap trial) is that for Asante, this is a trial, with the opportunity to go through the purchase process once it’s complete. If I decide not to keep the pump, I already have a postage-paid envelope to drop the pump into to send it back.

After just a couple of days, I can’t speak with much authority on the Snap. So I’ll just give some first impressions.

Maybe I’m a seasoned veteran after 4 ½ years of pumping (I doubt it), but training seemed a pretty easy thing with this pump. My local rep was knowledgeable and able to describe everything about every menu item on this device. Training was simple and straightforward, and the thing that took the longest was probably just inserting the cannula. Part of trying out a new pump also involves trying out a new infusion set. The one I’m using has extra long tubing, which can be a little tough at times. But the extra length really comes in handy when you have to put on a dress shirt for work.

I like that this pump has a volume setting. I cranked that sucker up, and I can actually hear beeps from my pump! I can also turn the volume way down for those times when I’m at a play or at the movies.

Programming a bolus is simple too, though I have one question of anyone using the Snap: After programming a bolus, have you accidentally hit the button to cancel that bolus when returning the pump to your pocket or belt clip? I haven’t done that yet, but it seems like it would be easy to do.

The display is nothing to write home about. Kind of like the Medtronic display (though brighter), I think of it as an MS-DOS screen, if you’re old enough to know what that means.

Taking the display a bit further, I should tell you that Asante is in the process of updating their screens to a color display, which should start happening in late November. Along with that, users will also have the opportunity to choose from a wide variety of pump color combinations. So my question was: If I purchased the pump now, would I be allowed to upgrade in November? The answer is… Yes. Anyone purchasing the Snap pump between now and November 15 will not only be able to upgrade their pump to a new color combo and a color display, they will also be allowed to keep their original version too. For someone new to pumping, this could be an easy way to get a backup pump for nothing extra.

I’m not a big fan of the belt clip. But honestly… Can you say you’re a fan of any of the belt clips from any manufacturer? I can’t think of a way to improve belt clips without invoking the phrase “putting lipstick on a pig”.

When my trial is finished, I’ll try to get a little more in depth with the Snap. In the meantime, if you have any questions, feel free to ask. If I don’t know the answer, I’ll try to reach out to my rep for the solution. Also, if you have experience with the Asante Snap pump, I’d love to hear some of your insights!

Disclosure: I’m beginning a standard four week trial of the Asante Snap insulin pump. This is the same trial that is available to all users who are considering starting on insulin pump therapy, or are considering a pump change. I was not given anything by Asante, and I was not asked to write about my experiences. In fact, I did not tell them I’m a writer at all. All opinions, as always, are my own.
 
 
 

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