Tag Archives: blogging

Seven. Seven. Fifty-Seven.

A quick check of the calendar reveals that it’s an important week.

My great niece is now seven years old. Also, this blog turns seven today. And I am now fifty-seven years of age.

It’s ironic, isn’t it, such simple math surrounding a blog that focuses on a condition that involves daily imperfect equations?

I’ve been trying to think of how things have changed in seven years at this web address. Probably, subjects have changed due to how the diabetes landscape has changed over the years.

Mostly, that’s good. There have been some fantastic developments over the years, from closed looping to new insulins to advanced advocacy from super organizations that do more than ever before to help people get their voices heard, and help those who need it most.

I am happy, and honored, to talk about all those things.

I don’t think there have been enough recipes here. I love cooking, but not everything I make can be written down in perfect amounts. There’s a lot of some-of-this and a little-of-that in my cooking. But I need to post a couple of new things I’ve tried. They were delicious.

I’ve managed to give away about 85 Champion Athlete With Diabetes medals, to people as close as Pennsylvania and Virginia, and as far away as New Zealand and Mumbai. But I haven’t given away any for a while, and I still have plenty to give away, so write me!

I’ve written a lot in the last couple of years about the way we communicate with one another. Doctors to patients, patients to industry, industry to everyone. I try to be as fair as possible.

I think I’m not as quick to get upset about things as I might have been seven years ago. I hope so. I still like to take my time, think about an issue, and see if there’s something there that no one else, including myself, has considered.

I haven’t always published everything I’ve written. Some things are better left unshared. On the other hand, I’m looking forward to sharing more in the future, whether it’s here or somewhere else.

I love my great niece. And I love her choice in birthday party food: fried chicken. I’m glad to be here today, even if I do feel older than ever. It’s not all bad.

Seven years of blogging about diabetes is not something I thought was possible back in 2012. But I love to write, so here I am. In seven years, I’ve gone from not doing anything or knowing anyone, to being busier in diabetes than ever.

I’m more than grateful for the support of our great Diabetes Community, and the opportunities that have come my way to meet and interact, virtually or in real time, with some of the most special people I will ever meet.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to prepare for two important diabetes-related meetings today. And my regular job on top of that. Life goes on. Thank you so much for reading. I’ll catch up with you again in a couple of days.

8 Things: Why I still love to write.

Happy to say I’m on vacation for about the next ten days. I don’t know how much new stuff you’ll see here, but look for me on social media next weekend when #AADE18 comes to my city. I should have a lot to talk about then. In the meantime…

I’ve heard some talk recently about how blogging is falling out of favor these days, and how diabetes blogging in particular may have already seen its heyday.

I don’t know if that’s true. I’m always the last to know things anyway, and while you probably aren’t reading as many diabetes blogs as you once were, there are still reasons for it to continue.

So while I have a moment, here are 8 reasons why I am still proud to say that I’m a diabetes blogger:

1. I believe in telling my story. Oh sure, you can get that “me too” moment from someone’s tweet or Facebook GIF, but a meme doesn’t quite tell the entire story, even if it gets a lot of notice in the moment.

How could I tell about nearly dying on the operating table last year in 280 characters or less? What about my trip to Europe and the diabetes management required to make it happen? Those are things that require more elaboration.

2. I believe in sharing information. Whether talking about a workshop or conference I’ve attended, or letting you know about a chance for you to attend an upcoming workshop or conference, I still feel a responsibility to share what I learn.

The informational posts I publish, like this week’s information on DPPs, DSMEs, and DSMPs, are the ones I really hope you’ll read. Knowledge is still power, and that’s why it’s important for all of us to stay informed. I like trying to help with that.

3. I don’t really care if you’re still reading or not. There, I said it. It’s not that I’m not grateful you’re reading; in fact, I’m exceptionally grateful you’re reading. But if I let page views dictate what I talked about, I probably would have become a basket case long ago. And my page views probably wouldn’t be much different than they are today.

This is one that’s hard to understand unless you’ve accrued a certain amount of mileage in life. But I can tell you that producing something meaningful, whether it’s meaningful to me or to you, is enough for me.

4. I don’t know how long it will last. I’ve often said that I can’t keep writing here forever. I won’t… believe that.

But I don’t know yet when the end will come. I know when it does, I will miss it terribly. So I look forward to continuing to write as long as I can.

5. Despite that, I don’t fear change. It’s true that the only constant in our lives is change. However my online advocacy changes in the coming years, it’s okay as long as it’s productive.

And I like to think that once I’m no longer blogging, it will be because there are many other worthy writers to take my place.

6. More than ever, patients deserve a voice. This should really be at the top of the list.

Patients are getting more of a voice, that’s for sure. But there are so many individuals, be they patients themselves, healthcare professionals, or the general public who still haven’t heard our stories. They don’t know anything about the power of the patient voice. Here’s hoping we can continue to show them what it’s all about.

7. There’s always another story waiting to be told. I don’t know what the story is, or where I’ll find it. But the thrill of finding that story and delivering on the promise of sharing it inspires me every day.

8. It makes me feel good. And connected. And useful. Every time I click “Publish”, I get a dopamine rush to beat the band. It’s good for my mental well-being, on top of all of the other good (I hope) it does. Even when I’m on vacation.
 
 
Here’s something that’s true for everyone writing a blog, regardless of the subject matter: Being free to express our thoughts, share information, and connect with others gives us a sense of purpose, and a sense of belonging. There are many reasons to say goodbye to blogging… but at least 8 that leave me feeling happy about continuing. For now. 😉

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