A window of opportunity is closing.

I really didn’t expect to write about this again, but… This still needs to be talked about. And for various reasons, this may be my last chance to write about it before our window of opportunity closes.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is in the process of drafting guidance for manufacturers of blood glucose meters. The guidance will be for future production of both over-the-counter meters (the ones we, as individuals, use), and the ones used in a clinical, point-of-care (i.e., hospital) setting.

As of right now, the FDA has opened up these draft guidance documents for public comment.

In other words, they want our input, and they’re even welcoming it.

But they will only accept our input until April 7. So please… Right now… Do something for me:

Go now to this one page, follow the instructions, take two or three minutes, and add your voice to something that will be extremely meaningful to me for years to come.
 
 
As I publish this post, only 167 comments have been posted on the OTC guidance.

As I publish this post, only 101 comments have been posted on the point-of-care guidance.

Every man, woman, and child in America with an internet connection should be commenting on this guidance.
 
 
Are you living with diabetes? Is someone you care about living with diabetes? Do you work with someone living with diabetes? Do you drive on a roadway with someone living with diabetes? Do you interact ever with someone living with diabetes? Are you starting to understand why this is important and critical and time-sensitive?

Maybe you don’t care about making meters more accurate. Or maybe you do.

If you’re living with diabetes, improving meter accuracy is important to you, and you know it, and you can do something about it.

If someone you care about is living with diabetes (and someone you care about is), improving meter accuracy is important to you, and you know it, and you can do something about it.

If you aren’t affected by diabetes at all, improving meter accuracy is important to you, and you know it, and you can do something about it.

Do something about it.

Go now to this one page, follow the instructions, take two or three minutes, and add your voice to something that will be extremely meaningful to everyone for years to come.

Future lives hang in the balance of blood glucose meter accuracy, and you can help win the day.

Thanks again to Christel Marchand Aprigliano and Bennet Dunlap for opening my eyes on this issue and leading the charge up the Hill of Guidance.
 
 
I now return you to your regularly scheduled day.
 
 
 

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